April 12, 2014

Coffee: Special Agent Dale Cooper says, give yourself a present.

April 11, 2014
wnyc:

Here’s the full interview with the mayor of Old Amsterdam on his visit to New Amsterdam. It’s pretty great.
-Jody, BL Show-

wnyc:

Here’s the full interview with the mayor of Old Amsterdam on his visit to New Amsterdam. It’s pretty great.

-Jody, BL Show-

April 7, 2014
gapers:

calumet412:

Tuition fees at the Art Institute, 1909, Chicago.

For comparison, annual tuition and fees for 2013-14 were $40,590.

gapers:

calumet412:

Tuition fees at the Art Institute, 1909, Chicago.

For comparison, annual tuition and fees for 2013-14 were $40,590.

April 6, 2014
SheCrew’s Sadie Hawkins Dance at La Bruquena: April 11, 2014.

SheCrew’s Sadie Hawkins Dance at La Bruquena: April 11, 2014.

April 6, 2014
West Of Western Exchange: April 12, 2014.

West Of Western Exchange: April 12, 2014.

April 5, 2014

Used coffee grounds are a great — free — resource to put to work in your garden. They enrich the soil with nitrogen and other minerals, improve soil structure, and increase organic matter in the soil. They may be used in compost, vermicompost, and as a mulch.

If you could use some of Beans & Bagels’ coffee grounds for your lawn or garden, just bring in a 5 gallon bucket labeled with your name and phone number.

April 4, 2014
Climate change: How climate change will brew a bad-tasting, expensive cup of coffee
by Damian Carrington

Climate change: How climate change will brew a bad-tasting, expensive cup of coffee
by Damian Carrington

April 4, 2014
Colectivo Coffee’s Sumatra Bintang Bener will be the coffee of the week April 7 - 13. Take a bag home this weekend and then enjoy a cup brewed at Beans & Bagels on Monday morning.

Coffee Notes: Sumatra Bintang Bener is grown 1,350 meters above sea level in Aceh, the northernmost province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The 72 farmer-members of the Gayo-Linge Co-op in the Bintang Bener village that contributed to this lot are producing some truly excellent coffee.

Sumatra Bintang Bener features complex notes of tropical fruit, while sweet flavors of caramelized sugar round out the cup.

Colectivo Coffee’s Sumatra Bintang Bener will be the coffee of the week April 7 - 13. Take a bag home this weekend and then enjoy a cup brewed at Beans & Bagels on Monday morning.

Coffee Notes: Sumatra Bintang Bener is grown 1,350 meters above sea level in Aceh, the northernmost province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The 72 farmer-members of the Gayo-Linge Co-op in the Bintang Bener village that contributed to this lot are producing some truly excellent coffee.

Sumatra Bintang Bener features complex notes of tropical fruit, while sweet flavors of caramelized sugar round out the cup.

April 4, 2014
Martin Luther King, Jr: 1929 - 1968.

Martin Luther King, Jr: 1929 - 1968.

April 4, 2014

Friday afternoon is often seen as the best time to ‘bury’ bad news. This notion aside, we have been making plans to alter our business model ever since Google made this announcement on April 1st.

Goodbye Chicago.

April 3, 2014

You just gotta love the way Thor slurps his coffee.

April 3, 2014
Who Needs A Boss?
By Shaila Dewan (Illustration by Kelsey Dake)
If you happen to be looking for your morning coffee near Golden Gate Park and the bright red storefront of the Arizmendi Bakery attracts your attention, congratulations. You have found what the readers of The San Francisco Bay Guardian, a local alt-weekly, deem the city’s best bakery. But it has another, less obvious, distinction. Of the $3.50 you hand over for a latte (plus $2.75 for the signature sourdough croissant), not one penny ends up in the hands of a faraway investor. Nothing goes to anyone who might be tempted to sell out to a larger bakery chain or shutter the business if its quarterly sales lag.

Instead, your money will go more or less directly to its 20-odd bakers, who each make $24 an hour — more than double the national median wage for bakers. On top of that, they get health insurance, paid vacation and a share of the profits. “It’s not luxury, but I can sort of afford living in San Francisco,” says Edhi Rotandi, a baker at Arizmendi. He works four days a week and spends the other days with his 2-year-old son.
Continue reading the main story

Deep Thoughts This Week

1. Co-ops are back in style.

2. Because they’re an effective way to battle income inequality.

3. Though they have a hard time attracting capital.

3. Well, duh.

Arizmendi and its five sister bakeries in the Bay Area are worker-owned cooperatives, an age-old business model that has lately attracted renewed interest as a possible antidote to some of our most persistent economic ills. Most co-ops in the U.S. are smaller than Arizmendi, with around a dozen employees, but the largest, Cooperative Home Care Associates in the Bronx, has about 2,000. That’s hardly the organizational structure’s upper limit. In fact, Arizmendi was named for a Spanish priest and labor organizer in Basque country, José María Arizmendiarrieta. He founded what eventually became the Mondragon Corporation, now one of the region’s biggest employers, with more than 60,000 members and 14 billion euro in revenue. And it’s still a co-op.

In a worker co-op, the workers own the business and decide what to do with the profits (as opposed to consumer co-ops, which are typically stores owned by members who shop at a discount). Historically, worker co-ops have held the most appeal when things seem most perilous for laborers. The present is no exception. And yet, despite their ability to empower workers, co-ops remain largely relegated to boutique status in the United States.

(Click illustration to read complete article)

Who Needs A Boss?
By Shaila Dewan (Illustration by Kelsey Dake)

If you happen to be looking for your morning coffee near Golden Gate Park and the bright red storefront of the Arizmendi Bakery attracts your attention, congratulations. You have found what the readers of The San Francisco Bay Guardian, a local alt-weekly, deem the city’s best bakery. But it has another, less obvious, distinction. Of the $3.50 you hand over for a latte (plus $2.75 for the signature sourdough croissant), not one penny ends up in the hands of a faraway investor. Nothing goes to anyone who might be tempted to sell out to a larger bakery chain or shutter the business if its quarterly sales lag.

Instead, your money will go more or less directly to its 20-odd bakers, who each make $24 an hour — more than double the national median wage for bakers. On top of that, they get health insurance, paid vacation and a share of the profits. “It’s not luxury, but I can sort of afford living in San Francisco,” says Edhi Rotandi, a baker at Arizmendi. He works four days a week and spends the other days with his 2-year-old son.
Continue reading the main story

Deep Thoughts This Week

1. Co-ops are back in style.

2. Because they’re an effective way to battle income inequality.

3. Though they have a hard time attracting capital.

3. Well, duh.

Arizmendi and its five sister bakeries in the Bay Area are worker-owned cooperatives, an age-old business model that has lately attracted renewed interest as a possible antidote to some of our most persistent economic ills. Most co-ops in the U.S. are smaller than Arizmendi, with around a dozen employees, but the largest, Cooperative Home Care Associates in the Bronx, has about 2,000. That’s hardly the organizational structure’s upper limit. In fact, Arizmendi was named for a Spanish priest and labor organizer in Basque country, José María Arizmendiarrieta. He founded what eventually became the Mondragon Corporation, now one of the region’s biggest employers, with more than 60,000 members and 14 billion euro in revenue. And it’s still a co-op.

In a worker co-op, the workers own the business and decide what to do with the profits (as opposed to consumer co-ops, which are typically stores owned by members who shop at a discount). Historically, worker co-ops have held the most appeal when things seem most perilous for laborers. The present is no exception. And yet, despite their ability to empower workers, co-ops remain largely relegated to boutique status in the United States.

(Click illustration to read complete article)

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